Feeling Hot Under Pressure

We are often asked by our clients what the standard sequence of steps is when approaching a first aid emergency and for every situation it’s always the same:

  1. Approach with caution
  2. Assess responsiveness of the victim
  3. Call 911
  4. Check for breathing

Each of these steps should only take a few seconds each, but they are each important in a rescue. Approaching with caution means that you are keeping yourself safe while trying to figure out what’s happening at a scene. Assessing responsiveness by snapping, tapping and clapping beside the victim’s ear will give you an idea as to whether this person is conscious, semi-conscious or unconscious. If the victim is semi-conscious or unconscious, your first priority is to call 911. (Ideally, you will get someone else to call while you take care of the victim.) Lastly, before you proceed with any treatment, check to see if the victim is breathing for 5-10 seconds. If they are not breathing, do CPR. If they are breathing, continuing to monitor breathing closely while treating other injuries.

Breathing is ALWAYS your priority.
Remember: life over limb

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Check out this month’s Quick Reference Guide about this strategic sequence of events. Print it off and keep it posted on your fridge for a few weeks so that every time you reach for a snack you’ll be reminded of these four simple steps in case you ever need to use them.

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

 

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Hot Hot Hot Fevers

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Fevers are never fun. Here is a link to information about fevers, as well as how to take your child’s temperature and treat a fever.

 

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

 

Electrolytes

We all need electrolytes for our bodies to function and this is especially true if we’re dehydrated and sweating. This can happen if we’re working out, but it can also happen on a very hot day where we can fall victim to heat cramps, heat exhaustion or even heat stroke. When dealing with heat emergencies, it’s critically important that we cool the person down with air and cool compresses, as well as replenishing their electrolytes. Here are a few electrolyte facts:

  • Balance of the electrolytes in our bodies is essential for normal function of our cells and our organs.
  • When you exercise heavily, you lose electrolytes in your sweat, particularly sodium and potassium. These electrolytes must be replaced to keep the electrolyte concentrations of your body fluids constant.
  • Apples, corn, beets, carrots and green beans, are all rich in electrolytes. Other electrolyte-laden fruits and veggies include limes, lemons, oranges, sweet potatoes, artichokes, all types of squash and tomatoes.

If you’re not a fan of processed sports drinks, here’s a link about how to make homemade electrolyte drinks.

electrolytes

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

Defibrillator Hot Spots in T.O.

Toronto Star reporter, Laura Kane, recently published an article about the most frequently-occurring cardiac arrest hot spots in Toronto. The data was compiled by researchers at the University of Toronto and St. Michael’s Hospital and they found that only 1 in 4 cardiac arrest victims have a public-access defibrillator within 100 metres from the site of the emergency. It takes the average person approximately 1 minute and 30 seconds to retrieve a defibrillator that’s 100 metres away and this is the benchmark we want to aim for. Every second counts.

I encourage you to read this interesting article and the key takeaway is to have a look around your community to find defibrillators located near you. Look for these types of symbols on either the door or in the lobby of a given building to indicate a defibrillator is available.

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You can also brush up on your defibrillator knowledge here and here.

 

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving and defibrillator skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

 

First Aid Super Tip #6

I am often asked to talk to new parents about drowning prevention and I am always happy to pass on this incredibly important piece of advice:

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For those of you who grew in Ontario public pools (like I did), you may recognize this poster. It’s from the Lifesaving Society of Canada in an effort to remind parents that they need to stay with their child at all times when in an aquatic environment. Water wings, PFD’s and lifejackets are NOT substitutes for parent supervision. Lifeguards are there to keep the busy pool environment safe, but they are NOT there to look after your child.

I have personally seen it happen where parents are at one end of the pool and their kids are at the other end. Even if they are in shallow water, you NEED to be within arms reach. The unthinkable can happen in the blink of an eye.

So the poster that I saw every day growing up is still the lesson I reinforce to all new parents – always stay within arms reach! 

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!