First Aid Super Tip #8

I am often asked whether or not it is serious if a toddler bonks their head. “If my little one bangs their head on the coffee table, should I be worried?”

The answer is “it depends”.

If your child develops a bump on the head (sometimes called a “goose egg”) it can appear within minutes or even seconds. Don’t panic. Simply use an icepack covered in cloth (a tea towel or shirt will do nicely) and apply it to the bump. If you don’t have a fancy ice pack at home, have no fear: the proverbial “bag of peas” (or anything else from your freezer) will work just fine. You should then monitor your child to see if they are showing any signs of concussion.

goose-chicken-quail-egg-comparison

First Aid Super Tip #8: Hard goose eggs are okay, squishy is bad. For obvious reasons any sort of soft spot on the head caused by an injury is not good. Seek medical attention IMMEDIATELY.

Additionally If you are in any way concerned that your child may have suffered any sort of traumatic head injury (whether the spot is squishy or not), DO NOT HESITATE to see your doctor. It’s way better safe than sorry to wait in the waiting room for any type of suspected head injury.

 

Use your head when it comes to head injuries!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

 

 

 

 

First Aid for Breakups

It’s that time of year again, when many university students come home for the first time since leaving for school in September to celebrate Thanksgiving with their families. It’s a wonderful time of year except for those who get an unexpected surprise upon their return… their high school sweetheart no longer wants them to be a college couple! They’ve been turkey dumped!

While this is no fun for anyone, there’s a first aid kit for breakups.

article-2329912-19F5D0EE000005DC-627_634x635

 

I hope you had a wonderful (breakup-free) Thanksgiving!

dianasig

If you are in the Toronto area and you’re looking for first aid training for injuries more tangible than a broken heart, we can help. Whether in-office, in-studio or in the classroom, we’ve got a training program for you – contact us today!

 

 

 

Top 5 Websites for First Aid Supplies

I’m often asked to recommend a source to buy first aid supplies, whether for business or personal use. While many individuals can find excellent first aid kits at their local drugstore, there are lots of great online e-tailers who carry hard-to-find merchandise. Below are 5 online stores that offer great selection of first aid items.

Costco.ca – You can always count on Costco to have everything you need, and the best part is you don’t have to buy your first aid kit in bulk!

Mountain Equipment Co-op – A great source for first aid kits for the outdoors (lightweight and waterproof kits).

DCG First Aid – This Canadian company offers a vast array of supplies, including difficult to find face masks for CPR and industrial kits to comply with safety regulations, specific to your business type and province you operate in.

Canadian Tire – Another great source for everything outdoors including emergency blankets and more.

Canadian Red Cross – They not only sells first aid kits, but also emergency car kits, which can be an indispensable resource in an emergency.

 

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

 

Kitchen Hazards: Grease and Electrical Fires

It’s very important to understand that not all fires should be extinguished with water, especially grease and electrical fires. By educating yourself about kitchen fire prevention tips, as well as understanding what to do if the worst happens, you will help protect your home and yourself from harm.

Click on the image below for this month’s Quick Reference Guide all about kitchen fires.

Screen Shot 2013-09-28 at 10.53.46 PM

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

 

 

 

Refresh and Feel Great!

I am often asked how often one should refresh their first aid and CPR knowledge. My short (and somewhat vague) answer is constantly. Certifications from the Lifesaving Society are valid for 3 years, this is too long to go without training in my opinion. And although I would love to teach and reteach my wonderful clients several times a year, I realize that this is both impractical and unnecessary in most cases.

A happy medium is refreshing the content each year in some capacity (whether taking a short course or full certification course) is critically important for maintaining confidence in your skills. Also check out all of our free online resources (Quick Reference Guide PDFs broken down by topic) to refresh your memory and maintain your confidence. Trust that you can handle anything!

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

 

 

 

 

First Aid Super Tip #7

To modify CPR for a visibly pregnant woman lying on her back, wedge a pillow or jacket underneath the right side of her abdomen. This will shift baby over to the left side, which helps blood return to the heart.

pregnant-woman

Here’s this week’s First Aid Super Tip: Want a quick way to remember this modification? “Mama’s always right!”

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, in-studio or in-office session today!

Concussion Checklist

Throughout the month of August, we have been blogging about concussions including an introduction, symptoms and treatment, prevention and further education.

Concussions occur when there is a sudden jolt or blow to the head. This causes the brain to move and, in severe cases, even twist, causing a dangerous amount of pressure inside of the skull. Concussions can be serious and have long-lasting effects if managed poorly (by having an athlete return to play too quickly, for example). This month’s Quick Reference Guide is a Concussion Signs & Symptoms Checklist.

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 8.11.41 AM

 

Be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your concussion awareness and lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, on-the-field or in-office session today!

 

 

 

 

 

Concussions: Further Education (Part 4 of 4)

This is the final post in a four-week blog series on concussion education. In this last post, we’ll get an insider look into how concussions can affect victims in the long-run, as well as provide resources to educate athletes, parents and coaches about the importance of concussion management.

Stories from Concussion Victims

It’s hard for those who have not experienced concussion symptoms to understand how much it affects both play on the field and life of the field. Here are three stories from the athletes themselves (from the CDC and Coach.ca).

Tracy’s Story (Basketball)

Shelby’s Story (Cheerleading)

Katherine’s Story (Soccer)

Further Resources

Concussion Prevention Lecture, Boston Children’s Hospital – This is a great video resource for coaches and physical education specialists to further understand the equipment available to help reduce the severity of a concussion

Concussion Discussion, Chill Magazine
Part 1: The Introduction
Part 2: A Historical Perspective on Concussions
Part 3: The Science of Concussions
Part 4: Society and Concussions
Part 5: The Aftermath: Life After Concussions

CDC’s Concussions in Sports podcasts, videos and other media – lots of comprehensive and colourful resources for coaches, parents and athletes.

CDC’s FREE Online Concussion Training for Coaches

As always, be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your concussion education and lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, on-the-field or in-office session today!

Concussions: Prevention (Part 3 of 4)

This is the third post in a four-part blog series on concussions. Concussion prevention is incredibly important, including how to reduce the likelihood of a head injury, as well as educating young athletes on how to prevent their symptoms from getting worse after having had a concussion.

Preventing concussions (or lessening the likelihood of a severe concussion) comes down to a few important things including wearing the right equipment (such as a proper fitting helmet), strengthening the muscles in your neck, proper technique in your sport and avoiding as many hits as possible. This advice comes from Robert C. Cantu, MD, Chief of Neurosurgery Service at Emerson Hospital and the Senior Advisor of the Sports Concussion Clinic at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Additionally, baseline testing is a great preventative measure that happens at the beginning of a sports’ season, whereby the “normal” cognitive functioning of an athlete is tested to be used as a baseline if a head injury should occur during the season. This type of testing gives medical professionals a strong starting point to understanding the level of severity of the head injury.

Additionally, wearing the right equipment that is the proper fit is another measure that can reduce the likelihood of a serious head injury, although it cannot safeguard against it all together.

Click here to watch a video (4 minutes) about the way in which some trainers are working to prevent concussions and understand what’s “normal” for their athletes through preventative baseline testing.

Screen Shot 2013-08-12 at 8.24.08 AM

With regards to preventing further injury after a concussion, it is critical that athletes don’t try to hide or “play through” their symptoms because this can worsen the symptoms and long-term effects. Staying off the field until the athlete has fully recovered (as determined by a medical professional), can be difficult for an athlete in the short-term, but is undeniably necessary for their long-term health.

Check back next week for part 4, exploring how concussion affect victims in the long-run, as well as additional concussion education resources.

 

As always, be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your concussion education and lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, on-the-field or in-office session today!

Concussions: Symptoms and Treatment (Part 2 of 4)

This is the second post in a four-part blog series about concussions. This week we’re looking at how concussions happen, signs and symptoms, as well as how to treat them.

3666263_orig

As we explored last week, concussions happen when there is a jolt or bump to the head. For an athlete, this can happen when there is a change in momentum; where a player was moving quickly and was stopped suddenly by another player. It can also happen when a piece of sporting equipment collides with the head. No matter how a concussion happens, it is critical for parents, teachers, coaches and athletes to recognize a potential concussion and treat it correctly. The signs and symptoms below are from the CDC Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) awareness website.

Signs Observed by Others:

  • Appears dazed or stunned
  • Is confused about assignment or position
  • Forgets an instruction
  • Is unsure of game, score, or opponent
  • Moves clumsily
  • Answers questions slowly
  • Loses consciousness (even briefly)
  • Shows mood, behaviour, or personality changes
  • Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall
  • Can’t recall events after hit or fall

Symptoms Felt by the Athlete:

  • Headache or “pressure” in head
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Balance problems or dizziness
  • Double or blurry vision
  • Sensitivity to light
  • Sensitivity to noise
  • Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy
  • Concentration or memory problems
  • Confusion
  • Does not “feel right” or is “feeling down”

IMPORTANT: Remember that these signs and symptoms don’t necessarily happen right away and can progress in the minutes, hours and days following a concussion.

First Aid Treatment:

  1. If a concussion is suspected, call 911 or drive to seek immediate medical attention
  2. Continuously monitor the victim’s level of consciousness and ask lots of questions (What’s your name? Where are you? Do you know what happened?)
  3. Additionally, check the victim’s:
    1. Rate of respiration
    2. Pulse strength
    3. Painful areas, loss of feeling or tingling
  4. Treat for shock by comforting and reassuring the victim

Remember to take the signs and symptoms of a concussion seriously because further agitation to the brain can lead to more serious and long-term effects.

Check back next week for part 3 in this blog series, all about concussion prevention.

As always, be calm, be confident and think common sense!

dianasig

There’s no better time to refresh your concussion management and lifesaving skills. If you are in the Toronto area, contact us directly to set up an in-home, on-the-field or in-office session today!